About Us

Dried fruit is fruit from which the majority of the original water content has been removed either naturally, through sun drying, or through the use of specialized dryers or dehydrators. Dried fruit has a long tradition of use dating back to the fourth millennium BC in Mesopotamia, and is prized because of its sweet taste, nutritive value[citation needed], and long shelf life..

  • The high fiber content provides water-absorbing and water-binding capabilities
  • Organic acids such as sorbitol act as humectants, provide dough and batter stability
  • Fruit sugars add sweetness, humectancy, and surface browning
  • Vitamins and minerals increase nutritional value and label appeal.

Traditional dried fruit such as raisins, figs, dates, apricots and apples have been a staple of Mediterranean diets for millennia. This is due partly to their early cultivation in the Middle Eastern region known as the Fertile Crescent, made up by parts of modern Iran, Iraq, Syria and Lebanon, southwest Turkey and northern Egypt. Drying or dehydration also happened to be the earliest form of food preservation: grapes, dates and figs that fell from the tree or vine would dry in the hot sun. Early hunter-gatherers observed that these fallen fruit took on an edible form, and valued them for their stability as well as their concentrated sweetness.[4]The latest recorded mention of dried fruits can be found in Mesopotamian tablets dating to about 1700 BC, which contain what are probably the oldest known written recipes. These clay slabs, written in Akkadian, the daily language of Babylonia, were inscribed in cuneiform and tell of diets based on grains (barley, millet, wheat), vegetables and fruits such as dates, figs, apples, pomegranates, and grapes. These early civilizations used dates, date juice evaporated into syrup and raisins as sweeteners. They included dried fruits in their breads for which they had more than 300 recipes, from simple barley bread for the workers to very elaborate, spiced cakes with honey for the palaces and temples. Because cuneiform was very complex and only scribes who had studied for years could read it, it is unlikely that the tablets were meant for everyday cooks or chefs. Instead they were written to document the culinary art of the times. Many recipes are quite elaborate and have rare ingredients so we may assume that they represent " Mediterranean haute cuisine"

Our Special Products

Coconut

Coconuts are known for their great versatility, as evidenced by many traditional uses, ranging from food to cosmetics.

Fig

Fig (genus Ficus) is a soft, sweet fruit. Its skin is very thin and has many small seeds inside of it.

Peanuts

Peanuts are similar in taste and nutritional profile to tree nuts such as walnuts and almonds, and are often served in similar ways in Western cuisines.

Pine Nuts

Sprinkle them on salads or onto vegetables and pasta dishes. They make up one of the main ingredients in basil pesto.

WaterMelonSeeds

watermelons seeds are 100 percent safe for consumption! I actually know some people who like to eat them, including many who roast them with salt like pumpkin seeds.

Dates

Dates (Chuara) For Skin, Hair And Health. Date fruit or Phoenix Dactylifera is one of the most nutritious foods that can either be taken fresh or consumed after drying.